Physical activity and your brain

Posted by Helen Potter on 28 September 2016 | Filed under Brain training, In Touch Physiotherapy

Physical Activity encourages  better thinking and understanding

A relationship between health literacy and participation in weekly (moderate to vigorous) physical activity is independently associated with good cognitive skills. Reference: Kobayashi L, Wardle J, Wolf M, von Wagner C. Health Literacy and Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity During Aging 2004 – 2013. American J Prev Med. 2014; 16. DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.034

Fitness and fun

Muscle Memory

Studies demonstrate that immediately after exercise, the body ramps up the action of many genes. These effects persist for hours to a day after exercise. If you continue to work out, the body starts making more proteins and that leads to more long-term adaptations.

When you continue to work out, the body starts making more proteins and that leads to more long-term adaptations which tend to dissipate quickly if you stop exercising. You lose muscle mass and endurance-training effects within five days of bed rest.

You lose muscle mass and endurance-training effects within five days of bed rest.

Recent research reveals that muscles that have trained hard in the past, and those that have not trained, show similar gene changes.

Findings also suggest that being a past tennis professional is no guarantee that you could quickly pick up the sport again at the same level.

Nerve Memory

On the brighter side, we now know is that the nerves that supply the muscles, and the brain regions that control movement, do hold memories.

Your nervous system automates activities like riding a bike, serving a tennis ball and learning how to walk when you are young.

The term Neuroplasticity relates to brain changes related to learning new movements.

But the muscle power for a jump or a serve, still needs to be retrained. Ref: Lindholm Live Science.

Original article on Live Science.

Achieve Fitness with Following 7 Tips

1 – Start slowly and build up carefully. Start with low impact at a level to match your fitness
2 – Know yourself and your limitations. As a Physiotherapist I can modify your exercises for optimal and safe outcomes
3 – Warm Up, Warm Down and Stretch to prepare your body and mind for action
4  – Come prepared with supportive cushioned shoes and plenty of water to keep your body well
5 –  Choose a safe venue with an even surface and good lighting to minimise falls
6 – Record your progress to see how far you have come and to provide encouragement to yourself at where you are
7 – Workout with a friend to help your committment. No excuses!

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